Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future

Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future Te Ana Marina: honouring the past, moving to the future

Reconnecting with the site's history inspired a new look and name for this waterfront destination, and guided the design of the development

The newly-revitalised Te Ana Marina (formerly Dampier Bay) in Lyttelton Harbour is as much inspired by the site’s past as the present.

Whakaraupō – Lyttelton Harbour has a rich history of Ngāi Tahu land use and occupancy, and Lyttelton Port is the site where the first European settlers arrived in Canterbury.

Following the Canterbury earthquakes, the port faced unprecedented recovery challenges. The 2014 Port Lyttelton Plan covered a range of projects to be undertaken over a 30 year period, including the development of a modern container terminal at Te Awaparahi Bay. This would enable development of Dampier Bay as a public open space and commercial development area.

A cross-disciplinary team of Boffa Miskell consultants – urban designers, cultural advisors and landscape architects – worked with our client Lyttelton Port Company (LPC) and mana whenua, Ngāti Wheke, to develop an urban design framework and cultural landscape assessment of the site. These documents fed directly into the Te Ana Design Guide (2016) which sets in place a look and feel for Te Ana Marina that evokes the site’s rich history, while also addressing the modern-day needs of a working marina and facilitating a centre for community activity.

The Design Guide assists with understanding the new provisions in the District Plan and addresses how new buildings and public spaces will maintain and enhance the character of Lyttelton Port, and incorporate Ngāi Tahu cultural landscape values.

Five hui with Boffa Miskell, LPC and Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke representatives included visiting the site together in order to fully understand the historical information on Te Ana and explore design and artwork ideas.

Key cultural values associated with the harbour, and Te Ana/Dampier Bay in particular, relate to the shelter and resources the land and water provided, including bountiful fisheries.

Two traditional sites associated with the Dampier Bay area include Ōhinehou and Te Ana o Huikai.   Ōhinehou, located on the former foreshore at the Lyttelton township end of Dampier Bay, was a key settlement and mahinga kai area. Te Ana o Huikai, located within the original bay was a sheltered rest area for journeying waka, into and out of the harbour, particularly known to be used by Huikai of Koukourārata, whom the bay is named after.

On-going engagement resulted in the decision to gift the name Te Ana to the new Dampier Bay development, in honour of Te Ana o Huikai

While the original beaches, foreshore areas and coastline have been greatly modified over time, the significance and values associated with the bay form an important aspect of Ngāti Wheke identity, and which provide an authentic expression of heritage for the future design and development.

View the Te Ana Design Guidelines here.

For further information please contact Jane Rennie, Craig Pauling, Nik Kneale or Hilary Blackburn

13 November 2018